Chicago’s Hamiz Khan started his first 7-figure business by the age of 19. By the time he turned 22, he had already done $4 million in sales. His brands have reached over 22 million people ever since their inception.

We sat down with Hamiz to know more about him and his incredible journey.

EN: Tell us about yourself, Hamiz. How did it all begin?

Hamiz: I grew up in a relatively low-income household, we used to have 5-6 families living in a 3-bedroom apartment. My parents had a room to themselves, so me and my sister used to sleep on the floor.
My parents immigrated to the USA in the late ’90s and were wealthy back home, but due to certain situations, they lost some money. I lived in that apartment for about 15 years of my life until we moved in 2013.

Money was always an issue. Seeing my parents struggle day and night 7 days a week lit a fire in me like no other. I hated seeing them work and always tired but still struggling to keep up. I wanted to be the one who changed their situation. Give them and myself freedom.

I had millionaire visions and dreams at the age of 12, truthfully I had no idea what I was doing. I just wanted my parents to have enough money so they never have to worry about money.

I was heavily influenced by wealth creation and making an impact in the world at a very young age, and that’s where everything really started.

EN: How was school? Were you the quiet kid, or the troublemaker?

Hamiz: I was a huge troublemaker, always got into fights and spent half of my school time in the principal’s office. I was the kid with the snarky comebacks and the kid who made everyone laugh even if it got me into fights. I was socially one of the best speakers. Teachers loved me but hated the fact I got into so much trouble after being a smart kid. But then again, who doesn’t love a little bit of trouble?

The trouble made me fearless. I enjoyed being bad. I liked the rush it came with. I believe to this day the risks I take are all because of the things I did in my past. When I want something my way, I’ll do anything in my power to get there. Even if it’s risking everything I have.

This mentality has made me reach every single goal I’ve ever set for myself. I don’t go down easy.

EN: Why did you choose the career path you did?

Hamiz: I hated the fact you had to work for 60 years of your life, retire then live a life where you can’t even get out of bed without support. I hated the fact that this was the “Known” lifestyle for almost everyone.

Go to school, save money, retire rich.

What’s the point of being rich at an age when you can’t even enjoy life properly?

Most of this stems from inspecting my teachers and people with regular jobs. Most hated their job, to me it felt like they’re only there because they’re getting paid and it’s comfortable to earn a paycheck month to month, without worrying about anything because it’s safe and consistent.

EN: What would you say to our young readers, who would one day like to replicate the incredible feat you’ve achieved?

Hamiz: Remember, Comfort Kills.

I always reminded myself that I started making money very early on with no one watching. On my own terms, with my own ideas without anyone interrupting me on what I was doing.

I took into account how much money I made. How much more could be made, and how much I can make in a year if I continue. It was way more than my teachers and anyone I knew at the time.

On Youtube seeing entrepreneurs travel the world, with millions of dollars to their names and just enjoying life looked much more appealing than going to school. Get a job, retire at 60. “Enjoy your riches” when you can’t even properly walk.

I wanted to enjoy my riches at a young age and wanted my parents to enjoy it with me.

I only liked school very early on just because I was learning new things, things that were making me challenge myself and consistently grow out of the old me.

The thing I hated was the fact I’d have to wake up early in the morning and to go to a place I was forced to go that I had no real interest in. Learning history wasn’t helping my future, nor would it help me in the future.

It’s in the past, let it be.

I was good at reading, I was great at math. But these things were not going to help me in the future.

EN: Anything else you’d like our readers to know about you?

Hamiz: I’ve done numbers and have the proof of it, people around me know how great my branding is. I’ve created retail store numbers from my parents basement with the quality that retail stores cannot match.

I believe all my brands and my future endeavours will be great to me for the time and pain I’ve suffered in learning, losing money, relationships, friends and mostly everything good I had going.

There were points in my life where there was no front or back, I just had to go not knowing what will happen. I continued and perfected myself. In some places I got very lucky, but at the end of the day, it was consistency. Hard work, and never taking no for an answer. If it has to be done, it had to be done. No no’s. No stopping.

Everyone has the chance of becoming great, but not everyone wants to take the risk it comes with.

You lose everything at first, but it slowly comes back even better.

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